Best Glaucoma Specialist in Delhi

What Is Glaucoma Or ‘Kala Motia’?

Glaucoma, commonly known as ‘kala motia’ in South Asia, is a group of Eye diseases that can cause permanent vision loss if left untreated. It is caused by damage to the optic nerve, which connects the eye to the brain and helps transmit visual information. There are two main types of glaucoma: open-angle glaucoma and angle-closure glaucoma. Open-angle glaucoma is the most common type and occurs when the drainage canals in the eye become clogged over time, causing pressure to build up inside the eye. This increased pressure can damage the optic nerve and lead to vision loss. Angle-closure glaucoma, on the other hand, occurs when the iris (the colored part of the eye) blocks the drainage canals, causing sudden and severe increases in eye pressure. Glaucoma often develops gradually and may not have any noticeable symptoms until significant vision loss has occurred. However, some people may experience symptoms such as blurred vision, halos around lights, or eye pain. Regular eye exams are essential for detecting and treating glaucoma early before irreversible damage occurs.

Risk factors for developing glaucoma include age (people over 60 are at higher risk), family history, certain medical conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure, and long-term use of corticosteroid medications. Treatment options for glaucoma depend on the severity of the disease and may include prescription eye drops, oral medications, laser therapy, or surgery. The goal of treatment is to lower eye pressure and prevent further damage to the optic nerve. Early detection and treatment are crucial in managing glaucoma and preserving vision. In conclusion, glaucoma is a serious eye disease that can cause irreversible vision loss if left untreated. Regular eye exams and awareness of risk factors can help detect and manage the disease early. If you experience any changes in your vision or have concerns about your eye health, it is important to consult with an eye care professional.

Open-Angle Glaucoma

Open-angle glaucoma is a common eye condition that affects millions of people worldwide. It occurs when the pressure inside the eye (intraocular pressure) gradually increases over time, damaging the optic nerve and leading to vision loss. This type of glaucoma is called "open-angle" because the angle between the iris and cornea remains open, allowing fluid to drain out of the eye. The exact cause of open-angle glaucoma is not yet fully understood, but it is believed to be related to genetics, age, and other factors such as high blood pressure or diabetes. The risk of developing this condition increases with age, and it is more common in people of African descent than in other ethnic groups. Symptoms of open-angle glaucoma may not appear until late in the disease process, which is why regular eye exams are important for early detection and treatment. Some signs to watch for include blurred vision, halos around lights, difficulty adjusting to low light levels, and decreased peripheral vision.

Treatment for open-angle glaucoma typically involves lowering intraocular pressure through medications, laser surgery, or traditional surgery. Eye drops are often prescribed first to reduce the amount of fluid produced by the eye or increase its drainage. If eye drops alone do not sufficiently lower intraocular pressure, laser trabeculoplasty may be recommended. During this procedure, a laser is used to improve drainage by opening up the channels that allow fluid to leave the eye. In some cases, traditional surgery may be required to create a new drainage channel or remove part of the eye's ciliary body to decrease fluid production. While there is no cure for open-angle glaucoma, early diagnosis and treatment can help slow its progression and preserve vision. Regular eye exams, especially for those at higher risk of developing the condition, are crucial for maintaining good eye health and preventing irreversible damage.

Angle-Closure Glaucoma






Angle-closure glaucoma is a type of glaucoma that occurs when the drainage angle between the iris and cornea becomes blocked, leading to an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) within the eye. This increased pressure can cause damage to the optic nerve, which can lead to vision loss if left untreated. There are two types of angle-closure glaucoma: acute and chronic. Acute angle-closure glaucoma is a medical emergency and requires immediate treatment to prevent permanent vision loss. Symptoms of acute angle-closure glaucoma include severe eye pain, headache, nausea and vomiting, blurred vision, halos around lights, and redness in the eye. Chronic angle-closure glaucoma develops slowly over time and may not have any noticeable symptoms until significant vision loss has occurred. As a result, routine eye exams are essential for early detection and management of this condition. Risk factors for angle-closure glaucoma include age, ethnicity (Asian populations are at higher risk), family history, farsightedness, and certain medications such as antihistamines and antidepressants.

Treatment for angle-closure glaucoma typically involves lowering IOP through the use of medication, laser therapy, or surgery. Medications such as eye drops can help reduce IOP by increasing the outflow of aqueous humor from the eye. Laser therapy, known as iridotomy, creates a small hole in the iris to allow fluid to flow more freely, reducing IOP. Surgery may be necessary in cases where other treatments are ineffective. Prevention of angle-closure glaucoma involves regular eye exams, particularly for individuals with risk factors. It is also important to avoid medications that can increase IOP and to manage underlying conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. In conclusion, angle-closure glaucoma is a serious eye condition that can lead to vision loss if left untreated. Early detection through routine eye exams and prompt treatment are essential for preserving vision and preventing complications. If you experience any symptoms of angle-closure glaucoma, seek medical attention immediately

Symptoms Of Glaucoma (Kala Motia)

Glaucoma, also known as Kala Motia in some regions, is a serious eye condition that can cause permanent vision loss if left untreated. It occurs when the optic nerve, which connects the eye to the brain, becomes damaged due to increased pressure within the eye.

There are several types of glaucoma, but the most common type is called open-angle glaucoma. This type develops slowly over time and often has no noticeable symptoms until significant damage has already occurred. As a result, regular eye exams are critical for detecting glaucoma early on.

However, there are some symptoms that may indicate the presence of glaucoma

1. Vision Loss: The primary symptom of glaucoma is gradual vision loss, starting from the periphery or side vision. Patients with advanced stage glaucoma have tunnel-like vision where they only see objects directly in front of them.

2. Blurred Vision: Blurry vision is another common symptom of glaucoma. Patients may experience difficulty focusing on objects, especially those at a distance.

3. Eye Pain: Some people with glaucoma may experience mild to severe eye pain, particularly during an acute attack of angle-closure glaucoma. They may feel like something is stuck inside their eye or experience headaches around the eyes.

4. Redness: Glaucoma patients may develop redness in one or both eyes due to increased pressure in the eye.

5. Halos: Patients with glaucoma may report seeing halos or colored rings around lights, especially at night. This happens because of the light scattering caused by corneal edema (swelling) or clouding of the lens.

6. Nausea and Vomiting: In rare cases, sudden-onset angle closure glaucoma can cause nausea and vomiting along with other symptoms such as headache and blurred vision.

7. Photophobia: People with glaucoma may become more sensitive to light, especially bright sunlight or glare from headlights. They may also experience difficulty adjusting to changes in lighting.

It is important to note that these symptoms are not exclusive to glaucoma and can be caused by other eye conditions as well. Therefore, it's essential to get a comprehensive eye exam with an ophthalmologist if you experience any of these symptoms. Glaucoma is a progressive disease, which means that without treatment, the damage to the optic nerve will continue to worsen over time. Early detection and timely treatment can help prevent further vision loss and preserve the remaining vision. The most common treatments for glaucoma include medicated eye drops, laser surgery, and traditional surgery. In conclusion, glaucoma is a serious eye condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. While some patients may not experience any noticeable symptoms until significant damage has already occurred, regular eye exams can detect glaucoma early on before irreversible damage occurs. If you notice any of the above-mentioned symptoms, consult your doctor immediately to rule out glaucoma or any other underlying eye problem.

Treatment of Glaucoma

lower intraocular pressure (IOP)

Glaucoma is a group of eye disorders that cause damage to the optic nerve, leading to vision loss and blindness. It is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide, affecting millions of people. One of the main risk factors for glaucoma is increased intraocular pressure (IOP), which can damage the optic nerve over time. Lowering IOP is currently the only proven treatment for glaucoma. There are several ways to lower IOP, including medications, laser therapy, and surgery. The choice of treatment depends on the severity and type of glaucoma, as well as other factors such as age, overall health, and personal preferences. Medications are often the first line of treatment for glaucoma. They work by either reducing the amount of fluid produced in the eye or increasing the outflow of fluid from the eye. There are several classes of medications used to treat glaucoma, including beta-blockers, prostaglandin analogs, alpha-adrenergic agonists, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. These medications can be taken as eye drops, pills, or injections.

Laser therapy is another option for lowering IOP. In this procedure, a laser is used to create tiny openings in the drainage system of the eye, allowing fluid to flow more easily and reducing IOP. Laser therapy is generally safe and effective, but it may need to be repeated over time. Surgery is usually reserved for cases where medications and laser therapy have not been effective in lowering IOP. There are several types of glaucoma surgery, including trabeculectomy, tube shunt surgery, and minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS). Surgery can be highly effective in lowering IOP, but it also carries risks such as infection, bleeding, and vision loss. In summary, lowering IOP is key to treating glaucoma and preventing further damage to the optic nerve. There are several options for lowering IOP, including medications, laser therapy, and surgery. The choice of treatment depends on individual factors such as the type and severity of glaucoma, age, overall health, and personal preferences. It is important to work closely with an eye doctor to determine the best course of treatment for each individual case of glaucoma.

Laser Therapy

Glaucoma is a disease that affects the eyes and can lead to blindness if left untreated. It is caused by an increase in intraocular pressure due to the buildup of fluid in the eye. Laser therapy has been used as a treatment for glaucoma since the 1980s, and it has become increasingly popular in recent years. Laser therapy works by using a high-energy beam of light to target specific areas of the eye. The laser can be used to reduce the production of aqueous humor, which is the fluid that causes intraocular pressure. It can also be used to open up blocked drainage channels, allowing the fluid to flow out of the eye more easily. There are several different types of laser therapy that can be used to treat glaucoma. One common type is called selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT). This procedure uses a low-energy laser to stimulate the cells in the trabecular meshwork, which is the part of the eye responsible for draining fluid. By stimulating these cells, SLT can help improve the flow of fluid out of the eye and lower intraocular pressure.

Another type of laser therapy that can be used to treat glaucoma is called laser iridotomy. This procedure involves creating a small hole in the iris, which allows fluid to flow more freely through the eye. Laser iridotomy is often used to treat narrow-angle glaucoma, which occurs when the angle between the iris and cornea is too small for fluid to drain properly. Overall, laser therapy is a safe and effective treatment option for glaucoma. It is minimally invasive and can be performed on an outpatient basis, meaning patients can return home the same day. While there may be some mild discomfort or redness after the procedure, most patients experience little to no side effects. Additionally, laser therapy can often be used in conjunction with other treatments, such as eye drops or oral medications, to help control intraocular pressure and prevent further damage to the eyes. In conclusion, laser therapy is a valuable tool in the treatment of glaucoma. It offers a safe and effective way to lower intraocular pressure and improve fluid drainage in the eye. While it may not be suitable for all patients or all types of glaucoma, it is certainly worth considering as a treatment option for those who are struggling with this debilitating disease.

Glaucoma surgery

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve, leading to vision loss and blindness. It is caused by increased pressure in the eye due to the buildup of aqueous humor fluid. Glaucoma surgery is performed to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) to prevent further damage to the optic nerve. There are several types of glaucoma surgeries, including trabeculectomy, shunt implantation, laser trabeculoplasty, and cyclophotocoagulation. Trabeculectomy is considered the gold standard for glaucoma surgery and involves creating a small hole in the sclera (white part of the eye) to allow excess fluid to drain out of the eye. A flap of tissue is then created to cover the hole, regulating the flow of aqueous humor. Shunt implantation involves inserting a tiny tube into the eye to redirect fluid from the front of the eye to a reservoir under the conjunctiva (the thin membrane covering the white part of the eye). This procedure helps to lower IOP and protect the optic nerve. Laser trabeculoplasty uses a laser to open up the drainage channels within the eye, allowing the fluid to flow more freely and reducing pressure on the optic nerve.

Cyclophotocoagulation is a laser treatment that targets the ciliary body, which produces aqueous humor. The laser destroys some of the cells in the ciliary body, reducing the production of aqueous humor and lowering IOP. Glaucoma surgery is usually recommended when other treatments, such as eye drops or medication, have failed to control IOP. The success rate of glaucoma surgery varies depending on the type of surgery and the individual patient's condition. However, most patients experience a significant reduction in IOP and improved vision after surgery. As with any surgical procedure, there are risks involved with glaucoma surgery, such as infection, bleeding, and vision loss. Patients should discuss the benefits and risks of surgery with their ophthalmologist before making a decision. In conclusion, glaucoma surgery is an effective treatment option for reducing IOP and preventing further damage to the optic nerve. With advances in surgical techniques and technology, patients can expect better outcomes and improved quality of life after surgery.

Why Dr Neha Midha for Glaucoma Surgery

Glaucoma is a condition that affects the eyes, and if left untreated, it can lead to permanent vision loss. It is caused by an increase in intraocular pressure which damages the optic nerve. Glaucoma surgery is often recommended for patients who have not responded well to other forms of treatment.

Dr Neha Midha is a highly skilled ophthalmologist with extensive experience in glaucoma surgery. She has trained at some most prestigious institutions in India and abroad too. One of the reason why Dr Neha Midha is a top choice for glaucoma surgery is her commitment to patient-centered care. She takes the time to listen to her patients' concerns and works closely with them to develop a personalized treatment plan that meets their individual needs. Her compassionate approach ensures that her patients feel comfortable throughout the entire process.

In addition to her technical skills and patient-centered approach, Dr Neha Midha is also known for her attention to detail. She carefully evaluates each patient's condition and develops a customized treatment plan based on their unique needs. This level of attention to detail ensures that her patients receive the highest quality of care and achieve the best possible outcomes. Overall, there are many reasons why Dr Neha Midha is an excellent choice for glaucoma surgery. From her expertise in the latest surgical techniques to her patient-centered approach and attention to detail, she is committed to providing her patients with the best possible care. If you or someone you know is suffering from glaucoma, Dr Neha Midha is a top choice for surgical treatment.